Home | Keywords and quotes | abuse |

Keyword - "abuse"

abuse

Content

Explanation

In most contexts related to China, media and academic pieces tend to use the term "abuse" very broadly, with little clarity as to the specific details of its application. If used without significant qualification (for example, with reference to legal definition), this term becomes a somewhat meaningless pejorative to refer to any activity that the writer considers incompatible with their own values.

Publications tagged with this keyword in the title

Publications tagged with this keyword in the description

  • CNN Accidentally Busts Xinjiang Genocide LiesBrian Berletic | CNN admits it cannot independently verify an alleged former Chinese police officer who claims to have partaken in interrogations involving torture and witnessing sexual abuse in China’s Xinjiang region against its Uyghur population. However, CNN could have easily cross referenced his spoken and written statements from June 7, 2021 as part of the so-called “Uyghur Tribunal” where he completely contradicts the claims he made to CNN.

    Worse still, CNN never mentions that the alleged former police officer and others they interviewed took part in the tribunal, or that the tribunal even took place…



    07 Oct 2021

    Patreon
  • The architecture of repression: Unpacking Xinjiang’s governanceVicky Xu | By examining the Chinese party-state’s governance methods, this report purports to illustrate how human rights abuses are being carried out in Xinjiang and by whom. It claims mass campaigns aimed at political realignment are not artefacts of a bygone era. It also claims they are occurring at a time when Chinese society is more tightly connected with the world than ever before, and pursued along racial and religious lines in Xinjiang with profound social impacts.



    01 Oct 2021

    The UK Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office provided ASPI’s International Cyber Policy Centre (ICPC) with a grant of A$116,770 for this project, of which this report is a key output. Other components of the project can be found at the Xinjiang Data Project website: https://xjdp.aspi.org.au/. Additional research costs were covered from ASPI ICPC’s mixed revenue base—which spans governments, industry and civil society. This project would not have been possible without 2020–21 funding from the US State Department, which supports the Xinjiang Data Project

  • Publications tagged with this keyword in the tags

  • CNN Accidentally Busts Xinjiang Genocide LiesBrian Berletic | CNN admits it cannot independently verify an alleged former Chinese police officer who claims to have partaken in interrogations involving torture and witnessing sexual abuse in China’s Xinjiang region against its Uyghur population. However, CNN could have easily cross referenced his spoken and written statements from June 7, 2021 as part of the so-called “Uyghur Tribunal” where he completely contradicts the claims he made to CNN.

    Worse still, CNN never mentions that the alleged former police officer and others they interviewed took part in the tribunal, or that the tribunal even took place…



    07 Oct 2021

    Patreon
  • The architecture of repression: Unpacking Xinjiang’s governanceVicky Xu | By examining the Chinese party-state’s governance methods, this report purports to illustrate how human rights abuses are being carried out in Xinjiang and by whom. It claims mass campaigns aimed at political realignment are not artefacts of a bygone era. It also claims they are occurring at a time when Chinese society is more tightly connected with the world than ever before, and pursued along racial and religious lines in Xinjiang with profound social impacts.



    01 Oct 2021

    The UK Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office provided ASPI’s International Cyber Policy Centre (ICPC) with a grant of A$116,770 for this project, of which this report is a key output. Other components of the project can be found at the Xinjiang Data Project website: https://xjdp.aspi.org.au/. Additional research costs were covered from ASPI ICPC’s mixed revenue base—which spans governments, industry and civil society. This project would not have been possible without 2020–21 funding from the US State Department, which supports the Xinjiang Data Project

  • Profiles
    Publications
    Articles
    Topics
    Keywords
    Claims